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Scotland

Silly Wizard

Silly Wizard: Take The High Road

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  • Take The High Road
    • 1980 - Highway SHY 100 45 [7"]
  • Side One
    1. Take The High Road
  • Side Two
    1. Take The High Road

  • Silly Wizard
    • Andy Stewart, Phil Cunningham, Martin Hadden, Gordon Jones & John Cunningham
  • Musicians
    • Roy Ashby played drums on Side One
  • Credits
    • Side One recorded at Castlesound, 1980
    • Side Two recorded at R.E.L., 1979
    • Front Cover Photo: Glandarroch House, Courtesy of Scottish Television Limited
    • Back Cover Photos: Studley Photographic Services Limited
    • Sleeve Design and Artwork: John Crane
    • Executive Producer: John Zollman

Sleeve Notes

TAKE THE HIGH ROAD
ARTHUR BLAKE who wrote this popular theme has been head of music at Scottish T.V. for ten years. He is an experienced composer, previously working for the B.B.C. in a similar capacity also in Scotland.

The T.V. series tells the story of a small Highland community which finds its traditional ways of life being changed by the economic realities of the eighties.

© Highway Records Ltd. 1980

DONALD McGILLAVRY/O'NEILL'S CAVALRY MARCH
Donald McGillavry was a captain in charge of a section of the Highland army during the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715. In this song, however, his name is used to represent the entire Jacobite force. We have linked with the song O'NEILL'S CAVALRY MARCH, a similarly stirring martial tune.

(from " So Many Partings")


SILLY WIZARD, the powerfully talented Scottish folk band have proved their musical skills and sheer professionalism both on record and over thousands of miles of hard touring throughout Britain and Europe and, more recently, in the United States and Canada. A five-piece line-up playing a repertoire mostly drawn from the Scottish musical tradition, Silly Wizard combine verve with sensitivity in an approach to traditional tunes and songs which is adventurous without ever losing the feel of the original material. The group's considerable collective and individual experience and knowledge of Scottish music has enabled them to write their own music in the traditional idiom.