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The Corries: Stovies

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  • Stovies
    • 1980 - Dara PA036 LP
  • Peat Fire Flame & Stovies
    • 2000 - Moidart MOICD018 CD
  • Side One
    1. The Bloody Sarks (W. Scobie/R. Browne) — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: vocal & guitar
    2. The Bonnie Moorhen — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: guitar
    3. Birnie Boozle — Roy: chorus & borann, Ronnie: vocal & borann
    4. Country Western Medley (words Bob Williamson) — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: vocal & guitar
    5. The Broom o' the Cowdenknowes — Roy: vocal & concertina, Ronnie: harmonica
    6. The Bantam Cock (Jake Thackery) — Roy: vocal & guitar
    7. Dumbarton's Drums — Roy: chorus & guitar, Ronnie: vocal & guitar
  • Side Two
    1. The Standard on the Braes o' Mar — Roy: chorus & guitar, Ronnie: vocal & guitar
    2. (Ye picked a fine time to leave me) Lucille (Lyrics W. Hill) — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: banjo & harmonica
    3. Arkinholm (Weir/Williamson) — Roy: vocal & borann, Ronnie: chorus & harmonica
    4. The Blackbird — Roy: flute, Ronnie: vocal & guitar
    5. The Bricklayer's song (Peter Cooksey) — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: guitar
    6. Welcome Royal Charlie (words anon; music Williamson) — Roy: vocal & guitar, Ronnie: chorus & guitar

  • The Corries
    • Roy Williamson
    • Ronnie Browne
  • Credits
    • All songs Traditional — Arranged by The Corries, unless otherwise noted.
    • Recording Engineers: Alan Spence, Colin Nicolson & Roy Ashby
    • Photography: Scott Wilson
    • Sleeve Design: Jon Field
    • Artwork & Print Production: Pan Graphics
    • 1980 Recorded Pan-Audio Recording Studios, Edinburgh, Scotland
    • 12 NEW LIVE RECORDINGS

Sleeve Notes

Stovies. This album celebrates the 21st year of the singing together of Roy Williamson and Ronnie Browne. To the Corries, folk music encompasses all aspects of the human condition, thus they have never become stereo-typed, or worse, treated their heritage as something weak to be preserved as an artform.

Communication, whether through a lament or a comic song is important to them, and they prefer to perform with, rather than at a crowd. Their huge repertoire, built over the years, shows the breadth of their songs, "come all ye's", all encompassed in a bit of the "crack". Folk is as simple or as complex as you want to make it but it will always remain. Let's hope the Corries will remain for a few more years yet.

R. Grant.