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The Corries: Live From Scotland - Volume 2

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  • Live From Scotland — Volume 2
    • 1975 - Dara PA008 LP
  • Live from Scotland — Volume 1 & Volume 2
    • 2001 - Moidart MOICD020 CD
  • Side One
    1. Lock The Door Lariston — Roy and Ronnie: Guitar
    2. Sunday Driver (words: W. Hill) — Roy and Ronnie: Guitar
    3. Come O'er The Stream Charlie — Roy and Ronnie: Borahn
    4. King Fareweel (From Isabel Sutherland) — Roy: Northumbrian Pipes; Ronnie: Harmonica
    5. Yur Losin' Them — Roy and Ronnie: Borahn
    6. Ettrick Lady — Roy and Ronnie: Mandolin
    7. Nancy Whisky (From Willie Scott) — Roy and Ronnie: Mandolin
  • Side Two
    1. Sae Will We Yet (From Rob Anderson) — Roy and Ronnie: Guitar
    2. Lord Yester (Weir/Williamson) — Roy and Ronnie: Combolin
    3. Reivers Galley (R.M.B. Williamson) — Roy and Ronnie: Guitar
    4. La-Di-Dum (Rikki Fulton) — Roy and Ronnie: Mandolin
    5. Johnny Ra (From Willie Scott) — Roy and Ronnie: Mandolin
    6. MacPherson's Rant — Roy and Ronnie: Guitar

  • The Corries
    • Roy Williamson
    • Ronnie Browne
  • Credits
    • Recorded in Glasgow City Hall, Motherwell Town Hall, Dunfermline Carnegie Hall and Edinburgh Usher Hall, 1974-1975
    • ©1975 Pan-Audio Ltd.
    • Recording Supervisor: Allan Spence
    • Record Sleeve Artwork and Photography by The Graham Falconer Visual Arts Group
    • All songs Traditional — Arranged by The Corries, unless otherwise noted./li>

Sleeve Notes

This is the Corries second volume in their two volume series "Live from Scotland", recorded on tour 1974/75 at Glasgow City Hall, Motherwell Town Hall, Dunfermline Carnegie Hall and Edinburgh Usher Hall.

In these two recordings, we have tried to capture the sense of occasion that a Corrie concert has become. A mammoth task from a recording viewpoint, as the tempo of the concerts, and of course the running order of the material, changes from night to night according to the mood of the boys, the accuracy of their memory, their feelings, the rapport of the crowd, the strength of the coffee at half time, even, I'm convinced, the weather situation. These and many other excuses have been put to me by the boys for making my life a misery. To try and plot the moment to change tapes, to convince them that they won't be heard 30 feet away from the microphone, to tell them that hefty foot tapping will inevitably come over on the track, is a waste of breath and a source of endless amusement to Ronnie and Roy.

Suffice to say that recording them on tour has made me lighter by nearly a stone and for that reason and of course for the laughter, the stirring moments, the sad songs, the sense of having tried and I hope achieved a recording of the Corries live, it has all been worth while. Good Listening.

Allan Spence, Recording Supervisor