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The Corries: Live From Scotland — Volume 1

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  • Live From Scotland — Volume 1
    • 1974 - Dara/EMI PA002 LP
  • Live From Scotland — Volume 1 & Volume 2
    • 2001 - Moidart MOICD020 CD
  • Side One
    1. Fallaldy (R.G. Browne) — Roy: Flute, Ronnie: Guitar
    2. Mingulay Boat Song (Words: Sir Hugh Roberton) — Roy & Ronnie: Mandoline
    3. Lads Among The Heather (Trad. From the Singing of Jock Anderson) — Roy & Ronnie: Mandoline
    4. A Scottish Holiday (Parody of words by J.W. Hill) — Roy & Ronnie: Guitar
    5. Hugh The Graeme — Roy & Ronnie: Guitar
    6. Maggie Ladder — Roy: Banduria, Ronnie: Guitar
  • Side Two
    1. The Roses Of Prince Charlie (R.G. Browne) — Roy & Ronnie: Guitar
    2. Dark Lochnagar (Lord Byron) — Roy & Ronnie: Guitar
    3. Loch Tay Boat Song (Words: McLeod and Boulton) — Roy & Ronnie: Combolin
    4. The Mhm Song (Trad. From the Singing of Jock Anderson) — Roy & Ronnie: Mandoline
    5. Flower Of Scotland (R.M.B. Williamson) — Roy & Ronnie: Guitar

  • The Corries
    • Roy Williamson
    • Ronnie Browne
  • Credits
    • 1974 Pan-Audio Ltd
    • Recording Supervisor: Allan Spence
    • Record in Glasgow City Hall 1974
    • Record Sleeve Design by The Pan-Audio Design Unit
    • Record Sleeve Artwork and Photography by The Graham Falconer Visual Arts Group
    • All songs Traditional — Arranged by The Corries, unless otherwise noted.

Sleeve Notes

THE CORRIES
Well known in many lands through their fine performances and records, they have adopted a philosophy to their music which, apart from technique, relies to a large extent on instinct. The Celtic More, or instinct, one link with the ancient past which can guide the treatment of an old song today. Their interpretations are creative in the broadest sense, and sincere, in that they compose what they feel is naturally right. They take their music seriously, but are not afraid to have a good laugh with their audience. People are important to them and if they have brought an audience down with a sad ballad, will cheer them up again with something else. This, after all is what music is about; expression, entertainment, stories told, battles recalled, bizarre, situations recounted and above all the enjoyment of doing it.