image

Paddy Tunney

Paddy Tunney: Discography
Folktrax Recordings


The Mountain Streams

  • The Mountain Streams
    • 1975 - Folktrax FTX 163 Cassette
      • Brigid & Paddy Tunney and Mick Gallagher
  • Track List:
    • Brigid Tunney
      1. The Mountain Streams
      2. The Heathery Hills (Talk Before)
      3. Dritheairin-O-Mo-Chroidhe (Talk Before)
      4. Captain Colston (Talk Before & Between Verses)
      5. The Bonny Bunch Of Roses-O (Talk Before)
      6. Wee Paddy Molloy (Talk Before)
      7. The Soldier And The Sailor (Talk Before)
      8. Early, Early, All In The Spring (The Croppy Boy)
      9. Murlough Mary
      10. Talk About #1, 8 And 9
      11. Drinking Good Whisky (with Paddy on chorus)
      12. Easter Snow (Talk Before)
      13. Burns And His Highland Mary (Talk Before)
      14. The Wee Weaver (Talk Before)
    • Paddy Tunney
      1. Lough Erne's Shore (Talk Before)
      2. The Royal Blackbird (Talk Before)
    • Michael Gallagher (Paddy's Uncle)
      1. The Rollicking Boys Around Tandaragee
      2. The Devil And Bailiff Maglyn (Talk Before, also about previous song)
      3. The Hiring Time (Talk Before)
      4. The Deluded Lover (Talk Before)

  • Credits
    • Recorded by Peter Kennedy 1952.
    • Edited by Peter Kennedy and first published by Folktrax 1975.
    • Tracks: 1-10 Brigid Tunney (interviewed by her son, Paddy)
    • Tracks: 11-14 Bridget Tunney (interviewed by Sean O Boyle)

Notes

Three members of the famous Tunney family, a remarkable family of folk-singers at Belleek, Co. Fermanagh, N. Ireland, who were extensively recorded in 1952 by Sean O Boyle and Peter Kennedy. Paddy introduces his mother, Brigid, who remembers 13 songs, Paddy himself sings 2 songs, LOUGH ERNE'S SHORE and the Jacobite ROYAL BLACKBIRD, and there are also 4 from his uncle, Brigid's brother, Michael Gallagher, TANDARAGEE, BAILIFF MAGLYN, THE HIRING TIME and the now popular version of AS I ROVED OUT (here called DELUDED LOVER).

BRIGID TUNNEY was born in Rusheen, Co. Donegal in May 1886. Her father's name was Gallagher and her mothers, Meehan. Both families were farmers from Tower, Pettigo in Donegal. In her youth Brigid traveled back and forth between Rusheen in Donegal and Glasgow in Scotland. She married in Glasgow and moved to Fermanagh in 1927. THE MOUNTAIN STREAMS she learned from her aunt, Mary Gallagher in Tower; THE CROPPY BOY from Frank Gallagher of Crannog, "a big fine-looking man with a sweet voice" (She heard many other versions in the locality but thought this had the nicest air); MURLOUGH MARY came from her mother, Mary Meehan, and her grandfather Meehan on the Donegal-Fermanagh border. All her children were recorded by Peter Kennedy: her sons, Paddy, Michael and Joe, and her daughters, Annie Lunney and Maureen Melly.

MICHAEL GALLAGHER, Brigid's brother, Paddy's Uncle Mick, was born in 1891 and, when recorded, was working as a boot repairer in Belleek. Previously he had been a farmer, and before that lived 33 years in Glasgow. Like his sister, he learned his songs from his parents and grandparents on both sides of the family, as well as from aunts, uncles and others. THE DELUDED LOVER was from his aunt, Brigid, in Ballintra, Donegal. The title for this song was provided by the collectors; Michael called it AS I ROVED OUT.

index

A Man In Love Feels No Cold

  • A Man In Love Feels No Cold
    • 1976 - FTX-164 Folktrax Cassette
      • Paddy Tunney
  • Track List:
    1. When A Man's In Love
    2. Our Wedding Day (Talk Before)
    3. Johnny, Lovely Johnny
    4. The Lowlands Of Holland
    5. Tavrin Green
    6. Craigy Hills
    7. The Green Fields Of Amerikay
    8. The Banks Of The Tweed
    9. Prince Charlie Stuart
    10. Mary On The Banks Of The Lee
    11. The Greenwood Laddie (From Charles Boyle)
    12. The Shamrock Shore
    13. Lilt: Paddy's Return
    14. Rocking The Cradle (From Johnny Doherty: Song Followed By Lilting)
    15. Scots Bagpipe Lilts
    16. The Blackbird (Lilted Slow And Fast)
    17. The Wearing Of The Breeches
    18. The Old Hag's Rhyme
    19. Lilting: Reels & Jigs
    20. Son, Come Tell It Unto Me (Child Ballad: "Edward")
    21. My Charming Buachal Roe — Sung by Paddy's Brother, Joe, with Paddy joining in the last verse

  • Credits
    • Recorded by Peter Kennedy, London, October 1958.
    • Edited by Peter Kennedy and first published on Folktrax Cassettes 1975.

Notes

Brigid Tunney, Paddy's mother, who can be heard on FOLKTRAX 163, brought up a whole family of singers. It was time spent in gaol for his youthful political activities that made Paddy more aware of his own family's singing tradition. When he came out he wrote to Peter Kennedy and joined Peter and Sean O Boyle recording Johnny Doherty in Donegal, taking them to meet his mother at home in Belleek. Here are 18 songs, mostly from his mother, Uncle Mick, from Sean O Boyle's father, a ballad from a tinker Peter recorded, some liltings (Mouth-music) and an "Old Hag's Rhyme".

PADDY TUNNEY was born in Glasgow in 1921. He has worked as a forester, a road-roller flagman and as a cobbler. He spent 4 years in prison in Belfast for his youthful idealistic political activities for the Irish Republican Army, smuggling gelignite over the Fermanagh-Donegal border. It was in prison that he studied Irish history, began to write poetry and to sing his own family songs. On release he trained at University College, Dublin, as a health inspector, married, and worked at Letterkenny until his retirement in 1989. He has made a number of commercial records and more recently has become well-known as a storyteller. Here is Paddy's own memory of how he first became interested in his family tradition:

"My mother was a fine traditional singer. She taught me to lilt and to sing. Her father, Michael Gallagher, used to take me on his knee and sing to me. He knew both languages, Irish and English, and had a fine repertoire of folk-tales and ballads. He could make a good drop of the good old mountain dew, and was well-known to all the travelling journeymen, tinsmiths, tailors, cobblers, weavers and the like, who used to visit the locality in his young days. My father, Patrick Tunney, was a fine reel dancer, so that lilting, fiddling and melodeon-playing filled my most impressionable years".

index

The Deadly Wars

  • The Deadly Wars: Songs of Barracks & Battlefield
    • 1979 - Folktrax FTX-516 Cassette
      • Anthology
  • Track List:
    1. The Artillery Alphabet — Rowland Kellett, Leeds, Yorksh 1963 (First 2v)
    2. The Balaclava Charge — Bill Westaway, Belstone, Devon 1950
    3. The Battle Of Alma — Bob & Ron Copper, Rottingdean, Sussex 1955
    4. The Battle Of Harlaw — Jeannie Robertson, Aberdeen 1953
    5. Benghazi — Jimmy Kelby, Blairgowrie, Perthsh 1955
    6. Bold General Wolfe — Bob Scarce With Chorus, Blaxhall, Suffolk 1957
    7. Drink Old England Dry — Chorus Of "Boggins, Haxey, Yorksh 1953
    8. The Flag Of Old England — Charlie Wills, Morcombelake, Dorset 1968
    9. The Haughs Of Cromdale — John Mcdonald (With Melodeon), Elgin, Moraysh 1955
    10. Jock Mc Graw Of The Gallant Forty-Twa — John Strachan With Chorus, Fyvie, Aberdeensh 1951
    11. Mc Caffery — Peter Reilly, Cullyhanna, Armagh 1952
    12. The Poor Little Soldier's Boy — Alec Bloomfield, Benhall, Suffolk 1951
    13. The Royal Artillery & The C.R.E.'S (Royal Engineer's Song — Rowland Kellett
    14. The Scavenger Brigade — Bob Mccreesh, Armagh 1954
    15. The Soldier And The Sailor — (Composite)
      1. Harry Cox, Catfield, Norfolk, 1953
      2. Arthur Lennox, Aberdeen, 1951
      3. Paddy & Joe Tunney (With Guitar) of Co Fermanagh; recorded in London, 1958
    16. The Soldier's Return — "The Deadly Wars" Jeannie Robertson, Aberdeen 1958
    17. Swansea Barracks — "The Blooming Rose Of South Wales" Phil Tanner, Llangennith, Gower 1949
    18. The Two Soldiers — John & Ethel Findlater, Dounby, Orkney 1955
    19. The Wounded Old Soldier — "I'm Growing Old" Bill Westaway
    20. The Young Aviator — "The Dying Airman" Rowland Kellett
    21. The Young Soldier That Never Did Wrong — Mary Doran (Tinker Of Waterford) Belfast 1952
    22. The Battle Of Ballingeary Instrumental Song Air & Reel: Colonel Fraser — Paddy Taylor (Flute) Of Limerick London 1956

  • Credits
    • Recorded & edited by Peter Kennedy and first published on Folktrax cassettes 1979.

Notes

23 Songs, from traditional singers of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, provide vivid pictures of the worst of conditions and the bravest of contestants. The title of the album, taken from the song from Jeannie Robertson (#16), serves as a reminder of our immortality in war. Not only the Army, but the Air Force is included, with THE DYING AVIATOR from Rowland Kellett. Also included are instrumentals: a song air and a reel on the flute

index

The White Cockade

  • The White Cockade: Soldiers & their Sweethearts
    • 1979 - Folktrax FTX-518 Cassette
      • Anthology
  • Track List:
    1. The Banks Of The Nile — Sidney Richards, Curry Rivel, Somerset, 1952
    2. The Black Horse — Jim O Neill, Markethill, Co Armagh, 1952
    3. The Bonnet O' Blue — Jean Matthew, Longside, Aberdeensh, 1952
    4. The Female Drummer — Harry Cox, Catfield, Norfolk, 1953
    5. The Gallant Hussar — Roise Green, Arranmore, Co Donegal, 1954
    6. Green Grow The Rushes-O — Patrick Green, Ballinalee, Co Longford, 1947
    7. Handsome Polly-O ("The Bonny Lass O' Fyvie") — Thomas Moran, Mohill, Co Leitrim, 1954
    8. Higher Germanie — Phoebe Smith (Gipsy From Kent) Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1956
    9. Jackie Fraser — Frank Steele, Banff, 1952
    10. Johnnie Harte — Teresa Maguire, Armagh, 1955
    11. The Moorlough Shore — Jim O Neill
    12. The Paisley Officer ("The Village Pride") — Thomas Moran
    13. Prince Charlie Stuart — (A) Paddy Tunney (1st V) & Brigid Tunney, His Mother, Belleek, Fermanagh, 1952 (Remainder Of Song)
    14. The Rocks Of Bawn — Seamus Ennis (Of Dublin) London, 1958
    15. Shule Aroon — Elizabeth Cronin, Macroom, Co Cork, 1951
    16. The White Cockade — The Keld Singers, Upper Swaledale, Richmond, W.Yorks, 1954
    17. Willie Taylor — Jim O Neill
    18. March: O Donnell Abu — Ravenhill Drum & Flute Band, Belfast, 1953

  • Credits
    • Recorded & edited by Peter Kennedy and first published on Folktrax cassettes 1979.

Notes

One of the most popular songs of the Post-war Revival has been the title song, a recruiting ballad. Is it because it's about a detail of a soldier's clothing, a good tune, or the type of harmony the singers use? Whichever, the type of songs on this album seem to have an enduring quality. Irish singer, Jim O Neill, from Armagh, has a "penchant" for this type of song. 17 songs are concluded with a patriotic flute-and-drum march-tune from the North of Ireland.

index