Barleycorn: My Last Farewell  •  Discography

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  • My Last Farewell
    • 1988 - Dolphin DOLX 9010 LP (IRE)
    • 1988 - RCA Victor VPL1 6822 LP (AUS)
    • 1988 - RCA Victor VPK1 6822 Cassette (AUS)
  • Side One
    1. My Last Farewell (O'Meara, O'Meara)
    2. The Bramble and The Rose (Trad. Arr. Barleycorn)
    3. Mary Ellen Carter (Stan Rogers)
    4. Roll on The Day (A. Taylor)
    5. Heather Breeze, My Love Is in America (Trad. Arr. Barleycorn)
    6. Leaving Enniskillen (C. McGettigan)
  • Side Two
    1. Róisín (O'Meara, O'Meara)
    2. Candlelight and Wine (O'Reilly)
    3. Sing an Irish Song (O'Meara, O'Meara)
    4. Australia (Unknown)
    5. The Grandfather Clock (Trad. Arr. Barleycorn)
    6. Song of Home (Brendan Graham)

  • The Barleycorn
    • Derek McCormick: Vocals, Guitar & Bass
    • John Delaney: Vocals, Banjo & Mandolin
    • Dennis O'Rourke: Fiddle, Vocals & Guitar
  • Credits
    • Produced and Arranged by Noel Kelehan
    • All tracks recorded and mixed at Lansdowne Studios
      • except "Sing An Irish Song", recorded and mixed at Windmill Lane Studios.
    • Mixing: John Delaney
    • Engineer Lansdowne Studios: Catherine Considine
    • Engineer Windmill Lane Studios: Bill Somerville-Large
    • We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Dónal Lunny

Sleeve Notes

MY LAST FAREWELL
"My Last Farewell" is a new song which graphically captures the love Padraig Pearse had for his mother, family and country. Based on actual letters he wrote from Kilmainham Jail in 1916 the song shows how Pearse was not aware that his brother, Willie, would also be executed. "My Last Farewell" reflects how Pearse often referred to his beloved Ireland as 'Mother'.

BRAMBLE AND THE ROSE
Love grows like the "Bramble And The Rose". This story has been told many times before but never in quite as touching a way as this.

MARY ELLEN CARTER
The good ship, "Mary Ellen Carter", steered off course by a drunk skipper, sank after hitting a rock in a storm. She was later raised from the ocean bed by her devoted crew. The song illustrates the strong bond which can develop between a sailor and his ship in which he regularly entrusts his life. Written by Stan Rogers, a great writer and performer who was tragically killed in an air accident in his native Canada.

ROLL ON THE DAY
The last coal mined in the Rhonda Valleys came to the surface at Mardy Colliery on the 30th June 1986. Apart from unemployment, one of the legacies left to many miners after a lifetime's work is dust-related disease. In a very simple and poignant song Allan Taylor sums up the agony of many who have suffered.

THE HEATHER BREEZE and MY LOVE IS IN AMERICA
Two fine reels specially designed for toe-tapping in any language.

LEAVING ENNISKILLEN
Many an emigrant has reluctantly left his home with a heavy heart and only the daydreams of his future return ease the burden of sadness. This beautiful song was written by Charlie McGettigan

ROISIN
"Roisin" is a new song written by Sean and Frank O'Meara. In it, an old man reminisces and talks with love, yet sadness, to his beloved Ireland, whom he affectionately calls Roisin. To him, Roisin is a dear friend in whom he can confide because she alone understands what he means in his love song.

CANDLELIGHT AND WINE
It is said, "true love never dies", and the sentiment is well expressed in this song which is sure to evoke memories of broken hearts and perhaps even thoughts of how it might have been ...?

SING AN IRISH SONG
"Sing An Irish Song" was written to provide a catchy sing-along song ideal for parties, get-togethers and, indeed, wherever any gathering of happy Irish men and women takes place. In a spirit of love and friendship, it calls on everyone, everywhere, everyday, to join in the singing of an Irish song.

GRANDFATHER'S CLOCK
An instrumental version of the melody of this old folk song which told the story of the clock which stopped, never to go again, when the old man (its owner) died.

AUSTRALIA
A vibrant ditty which captures the character and colour of the Australian way of life, "G'day".

SONGS OF HOME
Andy O'Brien was a warden at Freemantle Prison when I lived in Western Australia in the early seventies. A shy but generous Corkman, he befriended us newer migrants. At night under warm Westralian skies Andy would sing the songs of home in his fine, untutored tenor voice and for those brief moments we were transportees in reverse - we were back home again. I came home but Andy O'Brien is still a warden at Freemantle Prison. (Brendan Graham)